What are the Symptoms of Insulin Resistance?

Still Under construction

Insulin Resistance causes many symptoms easily diagnosed as many other conditions.

Symptoms of Insulin Resistance

Fatigue. Sometimes the fatigue is physical, but often it is mental. 

  • Muscles, nerves, brain, and all other parts of the body require oxygen and glucose to function efficiently. Insulin Resistance deprives all of them of the necessary oxygen and glucose. 
  • RBC agglutination slows blood flow to the muscles, nerves and all parts of the body. RBC agglutination causes RBCs to shed oxygen. Further depriving all of the body of oxygen and glucose. 

Brain fogginess and inability to focus. 

  • Brain requires oxygen and glucose to function efficiently. Insulin Resistance deprives the brain of the necessary oxygen and glucose. 
  • RBC agglutination slows blood flow to the muscles, nerves and all parts of the body.
  • RBC agglutination causes RBCs to shed oxygen. Further depriving all of the body of oxygen and glucose. 

Depression

  • When the brain is deprived of oxygen and glucose, brain function slows down, going into power saver mode creating the symptoms of “depression”. 
  • Brain requires oxygen and glucose to function efficiently. Insulin Resistance deprives the brain of the necessary oxygen and glucose.  
  • RBC agglutination slows blood flow to the brain. Further depriving the brain of oxygen and glucose. 

Nerve Pain – Blood/Nerve Reciprocity

  • Nerves and all other parts of the body require oxygen and glucose to function efficiently. Insulin Resistance deprives all of them of the necessary oxygen and glucose. 
  • All nerves depend wholly upon the arterial system for their oxygen and glucose and the quality of their function, such as sensation, signal transmission and motion.
  • A loss of blood flow results in nerve cell deterioration and ultimately in nerve death starting within minutes. A deteriorating nerve send pain signals to the brain.
  • RBC agglutination slows blood flow to the nerves and all parts of the body.

High Blood Sugar

  • Mild, brief periods of low blood sugar are normal during the day, especially if meals are not eaten on a regular schedule. But prolonged hyperglycemia with some of the symptoms listed here, especially physical and mental fatigue, are not normal. 
  • Feeling agitated, jittery, moody, nauseated, or having a headache is common in Insulin Resistance, without immediate relief once food is eaten.

What is Insulin Resistance?

Insulin resistance is when cells in your muscles, fat, and liver don’t respond in a good way to insulin and can’t use glucose from your blood for energy. To make up for it, your pancreas attempts to make more insulin. Over time, your blood sugar levels go up, unless the high circulating insulin levels are further challenged by a prolonged period of fasting or dietary restriction, i.e. food allergies/sensitivities, Keto, Paleo, Vegan, etc. 

Why is your body not responding to insulin?

It is always assumed that the pancreas is producing an adequate quantity and quality of insulin. This may be accurate initially. However, as alkaline-activated pancreatic enzymes are activated within the pancreas, these enzymes begin digesting the insulin and glucagon producing endocrine cells. These enzyme them have access into the blood stream where they being breaking down the connective elastic lining of the blood vessels.

insulin resistance many common symptoms

You could be insulin resistant for years without knowing it. This condition causes ubiquitous symptoms that are common to more popular conditions, i.e. Low Thyroid, PCOS, Low T, High Cholesterol, etc. You can’t tell that you have insulin resistance by how you feel. The symptoms are common to all the popular hormone and cholesterol conditions.

Insulin resistance is often present for up to 10 years or more before an “official” diagnosis of Diabetes. Many never develop Type 2 Diabetes but suffer for decades from insulin resistance. Especially, those with long-term dietary restrictions. That is a long time to do nothing about it. It is also a long time for you to do something about it.

Waiting results in more prescriptions per person.

It is money in the bank for Doctors, Hospitals and Drug Companies to overlook Insulin Resistance, AKA: Pre-Diabetes. While you wait, they can prescribe Hormone Replacement Therapy, Thyroid Hormone Replacement, Cholesterol Lowering Drugs and Pain Relieving Drugs before they get to the real cash cow – Diabetes. Most will never develop Diabetes, but they will have you on these drugs for the remainder of your life unless you take action. Insulin Resistance and all of the ubiquitous symptoms are easily reversed. But they will never tell you that. Follow the money.

But My Blood Sugar Is Low Normal!

How many people are restricting their diet because of Professional and Social Media Influencer diet recommendations?

People with pre-diabetes or insulin resistance also can have low or normal blood sugars, if their high circulating insulin levels are further challenged by a prolonged period of fasting or dietary restriction, e.g. food allergy/sensitivities, Paleo, Keto, Vegan, Vegetarian, etc. 

PCOS Is Due to Increased Melatonin

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome is due to increased Melatonin regulates a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes including hypothalamic control of circadian rhythms, regulation of ovulation in women, and immune system stimulation, and the cardiovascular system. It has also been shown to influence cell differentiation where it can either stimulate or suppress cell division depending on melatonins concentration or the type of cell exposed to increased levels of melatonin.

Increased “Cell Differentiation”

In light of this, melatonin has been proclaimed to be a cure-all for everything from treating insomnia and cancer to acting as an anti-aging agent.

Most women with PCOS grow many small cysts on their ovaries. That is why it is called Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. Melatonin concentrations are higher in the fluid of large follicles (cysts) than in the small follicles (cysts) suggesting that increased melatonin in follicles (cysts) prior to ovulation may have an important role in ovulation processes.

Many women experience pain and increased symptoms during ovulation due to the spike in melatonin production. Often women call every month wondering what they did to cause a flair in their symptoms while others find that they may need to use ovulation test strips to help them know when ovulation will occur. The first question is: Where are you at in your cycle?

This would Infertility.

Increased melatonin levels are observed in women with PCOS, patients with dysfunctional reproductive organs, in patients of HPG Axis amenorrhea, and in anorexia nervosa.

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